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Old 11-06-2018, 10:52 AM   #21
mijj
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.....and me a 1957 Triumph Thunderbird. I guess that makes me a Rocker and you a Mod then!
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Tinker said
I had one a long time back, sprung hub ect....
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So did I. The sprung hub version that is, then the jampot version, then went to a 500cc gold star, not the DB34 one though (that has taken me back a few years ).
Jim

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Old 11-06-2018, 11:46 AM   #22
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Quote:
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Originally Posted by Bunkerbarge View Post
.....and me a 1957 Triumph Thunderbird. I guess that makes me a Rocker and you a Mod then!
-------------------------------------------------
Tinker said
I had one a long time back, sprung hub ect....
-------------------------------------------------
So did I. The sprung hub version that is, then the jampot version, then went to a 500cc gold star, not the DB34 one though (that has taken me back a few years ).
Jim
My last bike had it a couple of years full race trim engine and gearbox rebuilt by me, ended my biking days in 1968 with a speeding ban, cruising along at 115 mph.....a year later brought my first car....
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Old 11-06-2018, 08:37 PM   #23
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As we are only chatting about a TV program I hope I'm not going to be accused of going 'Off Topic'.

Two of my babies are as per below. The 1957 Thunderbird is the first of Triumph's shock absorber rear ends and one of the last pre-unit engines. Basically apart from a twin carb head it is a Bonneville engine for a fraction of the cost! Goes pretty well, handling is erm exiting and the brakes are 'interesting'! I really didn't like the 'bathtub' cover design so was pleased I found one of just the right year. Plus it is exactly the same age as me. Probably aged better as well!

The Enfield is how she was before a huge amount of money was spent on it to get the internals sorted out, which were in an appalling state. Flyweights loose, oil pump falling apart, rocker arms worn away, camshafts needed completely remaking, rear frame and rear wheel also needed remaking, girder forks needed completely rebuilding with new spindles, bearings etc...etc... It now has much more original reverse mounted bar end levers and a lever operated throttle. I have run it up a few times and had a brief ride when I collected it but I have yet to venture out from home. Hopefully in a few days time I will sort out the last couple of niggles and go for a run.
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Old 14-06-2018, 01:54 PM   #24
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I saw the programme last night and a part of it before. Is interesting and the wooden chassis frame and the seats have me think of scratchbuilding...
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Old 14-06-2018, 06:58 PM   #25
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I missed the original transmission but thanks to Dynax was able to watch the replay on the link he gave. Only a transmission corporation like channel four can afford the expensive way they went about it - thanks be. I wondered how much the CNC production of the wooden chassis cost? And was it beautiful? I liked how they saved the original wood struts by cutting out rotten pieces and scarfing in new wood. The man sewing the upholstery said he was an engineer before retiring . I think it is an excellent program.
Jim.
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Old 14-06-2018, 10:10 PM   #26
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I love Peter Snow’s enthusiasm. He sounds as exited as a little boy, as I would be
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Old 14-06-2018, 10:59 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mijj View Post
I missed the original transmission but thanks to Dynax was able to watch the replay on the link he gave. Only a transmission corporation like channel four can afford the expensive way they went about it - thanks be. I wondered how much the CNC production of the wooden chassis cost? And was it beautiful? I liked how they saved the original wood struts by cutting out rotten pieces and scarfing in new wood. The man sewing the upholstery said he was an engineer before retiring . I think it is an excellent program.
Jim.
My dad used to regularly joint new wood into old frames as part of his job as a carpenter. He usually did it with houses where he worked for the local authority. On occasions his skills would be required to venture into other areas like restoring the woodwork on Morris Travellers or in other areas. My dad made the grade to be a carpenter machinist which was considered to be higher then a joiner, (They had to learn the joinery part as well) and though he did venture into these areas on the rare occasion, the only two areas of carpentry he didnt have expertise on were turning and carving, which were considered more on the artistic side of carpentry, though I did see him turn and do more simple carved effects.
It is surprising where his carpentry took him as he became well renowned as his ability to open and replace locked doors without damaging the woodwork. If a lock did need to be broken into, he knew just where to drill to do it, though this would be the last resort as most doors were easier to open. (He often saw how police would break down doors and the damage it would result in, where he could get in quicker then using force and leave no damage.
One thing I remember he could do was as part of his work required the replacing of ropes in sash windows. He taught himself a way of replacing the ropes in less then ten minutes when the allocated time for the job was thirty minutes. As the conventional method did take at least 30 minutes, he kept it to himself as it gave him time fore a much needed break!
Naturally, when I needed a layout my dad would I wish he made the woodwork for it. It was getting him to actually do it as he was tired coming home from work. The problem I had was whatever I would build he would want to I aspect it and if it wasn't the proper way.... Was a case of "Dad... All I want to do is nail that wood I to that wood! "

The last decade of his job had him venture into plastics, and the last few years he was used to problem solve and sort out the mess contractors had made. As he was one of the last council employed carpenters and most work had to be contracted out in the last years, he was often alarmed by the poor quality of the work done by some contracting firms which clearly some employed as carpenters had had no training and didnt t have the first clue about the job.
Much work done had the need to totally strip the work out and start again!

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Old 15-06-2018, 08:19 AM   #28
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The Isle of Wight episode was extremely interesting and I particularly liked the fact that they constructed a completely new underframe . The method was also fascinating in that the underframe members were fabricated in an engineered timber made by laminating strips of timber glued together and then machined to shape on a factory which was then supplied to the railway as a flat pack. The underframe was designed on a computer too so presumably the design was sent to the manufacturers electronically much as Hornby and Bachmann send their designs for new model trains to China, A case of real life following the model world perhaps?
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Old 18-06-2018, 12:00 AM   #29
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I once visited a place that manufacture timber frame house 'kits'.

The frame layout design is done to the customer's requirements via an architect all in CAD. The CAD system automatically decides on the dimensions and the design of all the joints and automatically incorporates them into the drawings. When everyone is happy with it it is sent from the office to a huge completely enclosed machine where oak beams of around 200 to 300 mm square are all loaded onto a rack at one end of the machine. The button is pressed and you stand back and watch. All the joints are automatically cut into the ends and along the beams by a large turret tool holder in the machining head and all the pieces are fed out the other end onto a bed.

There, when everything is done, all the parts are loaded in the most compact and efficient order, wrapped in a plastic covering and the entire 'kit' is ready to load straight onto a flat bed lorry. Absolutely fascinating.

I'm sure the carriage frame would have been done in exactly the same way.

I watched the second episode last night and again found it a very well done program. What a beautiful finished product they created.
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Old 18-06-2018, 09:54 AM   #30
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I thought they made a wonderful job of the 4 wheel IOW coach.
It looked wonderful being coupled up and there she was part of a train again after all those years.
A most enjoyable program. ........John
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