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Old 09-06-2017, 08:42 AM   #51
Walkingthedog
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I still don't understand why people don't just use track pins. The Gaugemaster pins are extremely sharp and have perfectly flat heads. They can be pushed into ply easily with the end of some pliers and removal is a doddle.
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Old 09-06-2017, 09:36 AM   #52
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Originally Posted by Walkingthedog View Post
I still don't understand why people don't just use track pins. The Gaugemaster pins are extremely sharp and have perfectly flat heads. They can be pushed into ply easily with the end of some pliers and removal is a doddle.
I agree - track pins must be the easiest way of fixing track.
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Old 09-06-2017, 09:58 AM   #53
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I still don't understand why people don't just use track pins. The Gaugemaster pins are extremely sharp and have perfectly flat heads. They can be pushed into ply easily with the end of some pliers and removal is a doddle.
I shall be needing something like these in the near future but googling Gauagemaster pins, the 10mm length ones (the lenth I need) are Gaugemaster Hornby type. Are these OK? They are flat headed.
Jim.
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Old 09-06-2017, 10:18 AM   #54
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I think they call them Hornby type because they are the same size as the pre drilled holes in sleepers. Peco pins are very thin. Takes less than 5 seconds to push a pin in.
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Old 09-06-2017, 11:09 AM   #55
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I think they call them Hornby type because they are the same size as the pre drilled holes in sleepers. Peco pins are very thin. Takes less than 5 seconds to push a pin in.
My base board is 9mm I think so the long ones (15mm) would be too long and poke through. I assume that predrilling an appropiate hole would be ok?
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Old 09-06-2017, 11:21 AM   #56
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You won't need a pre drilled hole in the board just the sleeper.
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Old 11-06-2017, 07:04 PM   #57
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I model in n gauge and find copydex perfect for gluing track down before ballasting, I have done this on two layouts now. It also allows me to run stock for a while to uncover any problem areas before ballasting. I found pins on n gauge sleepers are far too difficult to do without damaging the sleepers.
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Old 15-06-2017, 10:53 PM   #58
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As a conclusion to this, I have to say going with screws was the worst decision I've made in this adventure!

I bought the ones recommended in this thread, and the slightly more expensive screwdriver.

I can only think that the screws just aren't up to the job as the threads on them are just being destroyed by the screwdriver. I simply can't get any of them up.

It's going to have to be a pliers job which is going to snap some sleepers, but there are areas of track I need to pull up to make slight adjustments.

There are filings all around the screws where the screwdriver has simply worn away the head instead of unscrewing.
There is a lot of difference in the quality of plywoods, Birch multiply will be quite hard to drive screws into without a pilot hole whereas some of those using far eastern veneers are quite soft. If I was you Big Ted I would try drilling some pilot holes.

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Old 16-06-2017, 12:39 PM   #59
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There is a lot of difference in the quality of plywoods, Birch multiply will be quite hard to drive screws into without a pilot hole whereas some of those using far eastern veneers are quite soft. If I was you Big Ted I would try drilling some pilot holes.

Richard
Thanks. Yes - but a lot of the time the trouble comes from trying to get the screw through the hole in the sleeper. I have to drill the holes to be quite some way bigger than they are when they arrive.
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Old 16-06-2017, 01:33 PM   #60
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Thanks. Yes - but a lot of the time the trouble comes from trying to get the screw through the hole in the sleeper. I have to drill the holes to be quite some way bigger than they are when they arrive.
Yes you will require a clearance hole in the sleeper ie. one the same or slightly larger than the diam. of the screw. If the screw cuts a thread in the sleeper you will find it will not tighten up to the baseboard and probably explains why the screwdriver is chewing up the head of the screw before you get it full tightened.

Richard
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