Change of car? Maybe.

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brian1951
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Re: Change of car? Maybe.

#181

Post by brian1951 » Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:24 pm

The next mad idea is cars without dipsticks, ( to check your oil with ) not the drivers.

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yelrow
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Re: Change of car? Maybe.

#182

Post by yelrow » Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:28 pm

To go with sealed batteries. My dad always used to top up his battery cells, and insisted on taking out all stoppers, when he charged them up. How are you supposed to check your own oil, with no dipstick.

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IanS
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Re: Change of car? Maybe.

#183

Post by IanS » Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:28 pm

yelrow wrote:
Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:20 pm
...Ians explanation about getting you to a garage, is fine, i suppose, if you live in a town, but not for us.
I understand that. I did say in the UK. It's not for everyone even in the UK, but for the majority it theoretically works. You're right, for pothole flats it doesn't work however in my case, the pothole damage on 2 of the tyres was to the sidewall. Not actually a leak or flat, just dangerous damage. The other one was about 30 miles from home and only 10 from civilization of Newcastle. (It was a flat from a massive hole on the A69 at 70mph that I couldn't avoid).

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Re: Change of car? Maybe.

#184

Post by Walkingthedog » Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:29 pm

Spare wheels aren’t particularly expensive. I wouldn’t drive a car without one. Our tractor has wheels full of gunge that is supposed to plug a puncture as it happens. So far so good.
Nurse, the screens!

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IanS
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Re: Change of car? Maybe.

#185

Post by IanS » Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:30 pm

yelrow wrote:
Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:28 pm
To go with sealed batteries. My dad always used to top up his battery cells, and insisted on taking out all stoppers, when he charged them up. How are you supposed to check your own oil, with no dipstick.
The 2 I've had that are like that had an electronic 'dipstick' that you could select from the steering wheel.

brian1951
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Re: Change of car? Maybe.

#186

Post by brian1951 » Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:31 pm

yelrow wrote:
Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:28 pm
To go with sealed batteries. My dad always used to top up his battery cells, and insisted on taking out all stoppers, when he charged them up. How are you supposed to check your own oil, with no dipstick.
All done by pressing buttons on your steering wheel John.

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yelrow
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Re: Change of car? Maybe.

#187

Post by yelrow » Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:50 pm

Thank you for explanation. Not sure i am a fan. Call me old fashioned but there is something hands on, about manually checking your oil.

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RAF96
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Re: Change of car? Maybe.

#188

Post by RAF96 » Tue Jan 21, 2020 9:35 am

My Karoq has the tyre repair kit but I opted for a spare wheel kit, which obviously gives you a jack, etc. £250 well spent even if I never use it.
The inflator kit I had in the Meriva was built into the side of the boot, very handy for checking tyres or huffing up the bike tyres. This one is stand alone, to match the other two tyre inflators I have collected over the years to support cars in various parts of the world.
Some recovery firms will not rescue you with a flat if you don’t have a spare wheel to change or will supply one and charge for it, else it is a transporter to a garage. My next door neighbour fell foul of this last week, having gone off road to avoid a deer and burst a tyre. She opted for the transporter to her house and the mobile tyre fitter was telling me about it.
On the subject of gunge, I had it in my caravan tyres but tyre repairs didn’t like it as they had to wash out the wheel and their kit after changing such a tyre.

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Re: Change of car? Maybe.

#189

Post by lugworm » Thu Jan 23, 2020 12:38 pm

We have splashed out and ordered a new Range Rover Evoque Dynamic s, with the 2.0l, 250 bhp petrol engine. It is due to arrive at the dealers mid-March. As we only do around 6000 miles a year we don't need a diesel.
To say I'm looking forward to March would be an understatement.
I'll put some pics up when it arrives.

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Re: Change of car? Maybe.

#190

Post by Mountain Goat » Fri Jan 24, 2020 10:05 am

Have "Gunged" many bicycles over the years for customers. My thoughts. It does work, and work well, but it is not without its issues. My cousins eldest boy decided (As he was working at the bicycle store and had access to the stuff) to put well over the recommended amount in. When his tyres slowly went down naturally as they aged (All tyres do this as time passes) he found his valves would not let any air through them as the gunge had bunged them up. (There is a proceedure to prevent this which I don't think he did, but it could be due to putting too much in).
When tyres wear out, the thorns in them have the gunge sealed round them, and one disturbes these seals by removing the tyres ready to fit new tyres on them. So one can see where it has worked. Unfortunately these holes in the tube without the thorns being there are then too big to seal. Tubes filled with gunge (We call it green tyre slime) can't be patched that easily as the stuff prevents the glue doing its job. So when a tyre needs to be changed, it is normally a tube change with it.
Also, old gunge is less effective. I mean... As the gunge ages it becomes less effective at doing its job. It hardens somewhat.
There is also the added weight. When fitting the tyre slime in a tyre one has to spin the wheel and stop it and spin it again. The slime needs to be spread evenly and this is the only effective way of doing it. Bicycle wheels are slightly easier to do this with. Failure to do this and the wheel is out of balnce and willhave one area with slime and then no slime in the other areas of the tyre. Buying tubes ready slimed will avoid this. One does need to spin the wheel at highish speed and suddenly stop it a few times if applying the slime seperately. The best way for slower moving vehicles like tractors is to give them a run after fitting the stuff while it is still fresh in the tyres.
I was looking at the instructions that came with the John Deere and I remember reading that if the tractor is to be used towing heavy weights, apart from aditional weight balast that can be bolted on the front, the tyres can be part filled with a heavy concrete mix to aid this effect.
Enjoying freelance modelling in 7mm narrow gauge Feel free to ask questions relating to the Mountain Goats Waggon & Carriage Works thread.

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