Modelling On A Shoestring.

Your place to show and describe in detail and with photos how you produced a specific item of modelling. Rolling stock, Building or something related.
Malcolm 0-6-0
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Re: Modelling On A Shoestring.

#21

Post by Malcolm 0-6-0 » Sat Feb 02, 2019 10:04 pm

footplate1947 wrote:
Sat Feb 02, 2019 11:32 am
Malcolm 0-6-0 wrote:
Fri Feb 01, 2019 1:17 am
I am quite parsimonious when it comes to modelling - if I can scratch build something I will, or update the detail on an older model I will.
Blimmey Malcom. Where did you dig Parimonious up from. I had to look it up. My wife did not know it either and she is member of MENSA Do you know how many meanings it has :) Too many for me to remember. :oops: Lovely :) ................John
I assure you my use of the word parsimonious was purely serendipitous ;)

Postman Prat
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Re: Modelling On A Shoestring.

#22

Post by Postman Prat » Sat Feb 02, 2019 10:25 pm

I thought 'parsimonious' was one of the vegetables with my Christmas dinner!!! :lol:
PP
The light at the end of the tunnel is probably a train coming towards you

Mountain Goat
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Re: Modelling On A Shoestring.

#23

Post by Mountain Goat » Sat Feb 02, 2019 11:49 pm

Sometimes models can be obtained from unxepected sources. For example, war games shops, dolls house shops or even shops that sell tropical fish. The latter can be especially useful for the larger scales. To get the best bargains, try to buy off season. For example, shops that sell fish may have a rise in sales at Christmas, but the month or two after their trade may go down so some may reduce their prices slightly to keep their turnover moving.
Now war games shops often have scenic items which even if prices may not be adventagous, the products will give one a wider choice. Dolls house shops may offer ways to light ones buildings or if one is modelling in the suitable scale, they offer an incredible choice. The tropical fish shop often make buildings and structures which not only are ideal for 7mm narrow gauge or above, but they are buildings designed to be immersed in water. Think garden railway! Some of the plastic plants they offer give very interesting potential.
Something else that comes to mind are with sound generation. I was once given a device purchased by someone who had difficulty in sleeping. They didn't find it worked for them. It could generate several interesting "Calming" sounds like rain, the sea, rainforest, jungle etc. The sounds were also acompanied by what ever suitable wildlife noises in the background, like seagulls for the sea, various sounds like monkeys, birds etc for the jungle and things like that.
One may find certain other sounds from childs toys which can be put to use. Not to be too onomatopeiaish, a "Meow" of a cat or a "Woof" of a dog come to mind.
So by keeping ones eyes open one can find rather interesting things which can represent great savings overall.
Enjoying freelance modelling in 7mm narrow gauge Feel free to ask questions relating to the Mountain Goats Waggon & Carriage Works thread.

Bandit Mick
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Re: Modelling On A Shoestring.

#24

Post by Bandit Mick » Sun Feb 03, 2019 11:42 am

I tell my wife I'm parsimonious - she says I'm just tight! Just been in a builders skip and liberated some Perspex sheet - will do as a guard for the front of my layout.

Mountain Goat
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Re: Modelling On A Shoestring.

#25

Post by Mountain Goat » Mon Feb 04, 2019 12:06 am

There is something relaxing and liberating about moving to freelance modelling in 7mm scale narrow gauge. I will try to explain in a way that is not intended to hurt anyones feelings in any way, be it modellers or manufacturers or even model shops.
When I was in 00 gauge I found I was going round and round in a circle. I would be working hard to buy the next new models where before I could buy all I thought I needed, more new things would come out. More advances etc. It seemed an ever continuing circle that I was unknowingly trapped in and felt like I had failed when I left my highly paid job and could no longer buy the models I wanted to buy.
The move to 7mm narrow gauge was an entirely new concept for me in that, having already a few 0-4-0's and various 00 gauge chassis spare at my disposal along with 00 gauge track to use, I was like a duck in water. If I wanted something, all I had to do was to think up a plan and make it! I found experimenting fun, especially if it worked! :lol:
I now found myself on the outside of the commercialism of the hobby looking in rather then the fast flowing waters that were felt on rhe inside. I now was able to relax more.
It really hit home when I announced (Without thinking) in my then favourite semi large model railway shop that I had now become a 7mm narrow gauge modeller. (He sold 0-16.5 track so I assumed he would be pleased). The man took it badly as if I had said to him "I don't want to buy from you..." After chatting to another customer while we waited for him to serve, he overheard me giving advice on how to wire point motors and he threw me out his shop". This really puzzled me as I was always polite to him and I had spent a few thousand pounds a year with him in the past. For ages it was on my mind when it hit me. By telling him I was now a 7mm narrow gauge modeller means I won't be spending much money with him, and it was why he suddenly became angry witn me. (I was like "What have I done? The other customers were puzzled also!")
Back to the main concept.... I found that budget modelling means that I have the ability to dip in and out of the commercial circle of model railway trade without directly becoming a part of it.
This new concept was a lifesaver for me, as my income had dropped and I had feared that I needed to invest more before I could build the dream layout I wanted to build. The new shift meant that the new 7mm narrow gauge dream was achieveable as I already had what I need as what I didn't have, I could make.
Enjoying freelance modelling in 7mm narrow gauge Feel free to ask questions relating to the Mountain Goats Waggon & Carriage Works thread.

Bandit Mick
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Re: Modelling On A Shoestring.

#26

Post by Bandit Mick » Mon Feb 04, 2019 7:47 pm

Wise words MG. If I was coming into the hobby now having the knowledge I have gained in the last 3 years I too would choose a larger scale narrow gauge to model in. Trying to model sensibly (not quite on a shoestring) is one of the aspects I really enjoy.

Mountain Goat
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Re: Modelling On A Shoestring.

#27

Post by Mountain Goat » Mon Feb 04, 2019 10:04 pm

One thing I may mention is that initially I considered 7mm narrow gauge as a way to use up those surplus 00 gauge models which were not worth much. I had purchased a Smallbrook Studio kit just because I like the look of it and I already had a little Hornby 0-4-0 shunter to use for the chassis.
Thus I could use up those old Triang wagons and things like that just as a fun sideline to my 00 gauge collection.
What started as a sideline quickly became my new found love. I am slowly reducing my 00 gauge collection which goes towards funding tools and things for 7mm narrow gauge use. I've recently been able to buy a Unimat Metalline in this way which is a massive purchase for me. (A little overkill as far as model railways go. :D )
A small 7mm narrow gauge layout is achieveable. Something about 2 to 3ft wide and around 6 to 8ft long is ideal. Mine is 2ft x 7ft when I assemble it. It is made from two boards of 2ft x 3½ft each. Use scrappy offcuts of 00 gauge track, though two yard lengths of flexible track will be needed for the sharp curves if using a 2ft wide board. If one uses 3ft wide boards, one can use old Hornby 1st radius curves.
Enjoying freelance modelling in 7mm narrow gauge Feel free to ask questions relating to the Mountain Goats Waggon & Carriage Works thread.

jrsaito
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Re: Modelling On A Shoestring.

#28

Post by jrsaito » Wed Feb 06, 2019 9:35 pm

It is amazing what you can find and re-use. My layout has four 6ft x 2ft baseboards. I got a large amount of free 10mm plywood from a very large discarded packing case from a tile warehouse. A also got a lot of 6ft lengths of timber for the baseboard supports from discarded pallets used to transport large electrical appliances. Bit of an effort to dismantle them but a lot of the wood was very good - straight and not full of knots. The baseboards have proved strong and have stayed straight. I also used expanded foam offcuts from a builder's skip for ramps and scenery.

Mountain Goat
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Re: Modelling On A Shoestring.

#29

Post by Mountain Goat » Thu Feb 07, 2019 6:07 pm

I agree. The framework for one of my boards came from wood washed up on a local beach. The othetr board has wood from an old bunk bed. The legs came from wood which which a builder offered us as fire wood.
Enjoying freelance modelling in 7mm narrow gauge Feel free to ask questions relating to the Mountain Goats Waggon & Carriage Works thread.

Cliffyg
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Re: Modelling On A Shoestring.

#30

Post by Cliffyg » Thu Feb 07, 2019 11:41 pm

Good topic !
My banks and hills are cast off polystyrene covered with papier mache , cheap as chips and look authentic enough for me :D
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